Amateur Photography help

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Amateur Photography help

Postby Paladin656 » Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:57 pm

I recent came into possession of a Petri FT 35mm camera from the 70's I think I was told. Older than me at any rate. I'm looking for advice in some photography, all I've done before is point and click with a friend's digital and am looking for good resources

My main goal is to take low light actiony pics, like at the clubs and such. I've taken some that came out good with the digital cameras, but the flash washes out the subdued lightly that makes the club a club lol. If I don't use the flash, I either get a red image, or a hardly visible image, so I thought I'd play around with this camera some and see what happened.

Any advice would be welcome
(cross posted on KF, hope that's not a problem)
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Re: Amateur Photography help

Postby Bone » Mon Jul 10, 2006 4:18 pm

Paladin656 wrote:I recent came into possession of a Petri FT 35mm camera from the 70's I think I was told. Older than me at any rate. I'm looking for advice in some photography, all I've done before is point and click with a friend's digital and am looking for good resources

My main goal is to take low light actiony pics, like at the clubs and such. I've taken some that came out good with the digital cameras, but the flash washes out the subdued lightly that makes the club a club lol. If I don't use the flash, I either get a red image, or a hardly visible image, so I thought I'd play around with this camera some and see what happened.

Any advice would be welcome
(cross posted on KF, hope that's not a problem)


It becomes a job matching proper speed film, f-stop, and appeture setting on the camera. Most important to start with is the film you use.
here are some tips for choosing film taken from ehow.com
1. Decide whether you want photographs or slides, color or black-and-white. Many professional photographers prefer slides because they have rich color saturation and minimal graininess. Black-and-white delivers striking images with stark textures.

2. Choose a film size that is appropriate for your camera. Most cameras use 35 mm (or 135) film, though cartridge-film cameras need 24 mm Advanced Photo System (APS) film. Roll-film cameras use 120 or 220; large-format, hooded view cameras use single sheets of film for each exposure (4 by 5 inches and up).

3. Understand how film speed works. Fast speeds pick up rapid action and work well in low-light situations. Slower speeds produce richer colors and greater contrast, but you'll need bright light and a steady hand. Film speed is indicated by an ISO number (how sensitive a film is to light compared to a standard from the International Standards Organization). The faster the film, the more sensitive.

4. Choose a slow speed (25 to 64 ASA) if you want minimal graininess and colors that punch, but only if you'll be photographing in the bright sunlight. Slow speeds are excellent for close-ups, still shots and photos you plan to enlarge. You may need a tripod to steady the camera with slow film.

5. Select a medium speed (100 to 200 ASA) if you want an all-purpose film that delivers clear colors and images outdoors, or indoors with a flash.

6. Opt for 400 speed if you'll be photographing action shots or if you'll be in low-light conditions, such as cloudy days or indoors without a flash. Zoom lenses require the use of higher-speed films (400 ASA and up).

7. Get 800-speed film if you're photographing very fast action or shots with dim light. This is ideal for a fireworks show, twilight or a candlelit dinner. Speeds above 800 (1,000 to 3,200 ASA) are considered professional speeds.

8. Use slide film for appropriate light if you prefer slides to photos: daylight for indoors, or tungsten light for flash photography.

9. Look for store-brand films to save money unless you plan on making significant enlargements or publishing your work.

10. Store film in a cool, dry place with good ventilation, such as a refrigerator, and get it developed as soon as the roll is finished. Never expose film to heat or direct sunlight.

Overall Tips:
The techniques used at same-day film developers often result in grainy pictures with dull colors. Choose a store that has someone monitoring the developing process--this person can make adjustments to optimize color and contrast.


Personally I mostly use 800 and up ASA in my camera for club shots, 400 for outdoor daytime shooting, unless shooting action photos. Then its back to the 800+ to avoid blurry moving images.

Make sure to set the film speed on your camera when you put your film in so the camera knows how to adjust itself for light in the lens.

Hope that helps you get started.
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Postby Paladin656 » Tue Jul 11, 2006 12:54 pm

Info good. Thank you.

Is there a good developer anyone can reccomend? I dunno if I wanna give my stuff over to a local walmart for one hour rush job.
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Postby Hardcoregirl » Tue Jul 11, 2006 1:25 pm

Paladin656 wrote:Info good. Thank you.

Is there a good developer anyone can reccomend? I dunno if I wanna give my stuff over to a local walmart for one hour rush job.


I think Thompson is the best in this area...there is one near campus near where middlebrook runs into western I believe.
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Postby Mother Mo » Tue Jul 11, 2006 2:04 pm

Hardcoregirl wrote:
Paladin656 wrote:Info good. Thank you.

Is there a good developer anyone can reccomend? I dunno if I wanna give my stuff over to a local walmart for one hour rush job.


I think Thompson is the best in this area...there is one near campus near where middlebrook runs into western I believe.


I second the Thompson's option.
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