Restaurant style curry

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Restaurant style curry

Postby Zeo » Mon Apr 17, 2006 8:36 pm

I have been experimenting with various curry sauce recipes which I have found on the net a little as of late, none of which have provided the desired taste.
I'm looking to find a good recipe for curry sauce, for chicken, of the quality and taste which you would find at Indian restaurants such as our local 'Sitar'.

Any recipes or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. :)
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Postby Coor » Mon Apr 17, 2006 9:24 pm

No suggestions...since I'm working on cooking chicken without burning it. However, when you find one you like...I'll be a taste tester for ya ;)
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Postby Francesca » Tue Apr 18, 2006 11:18 am

I tried to call my best friend and cooking guru Beth but she is out now. I left her a message and will post again when I hear from her.. She's got a very sensitive palate and is good at deciphering spice combinations for sauces....

In the meantime, have you ever explored the following website:

http://allrecipes.com/

I can often find several recipies for the same dish, compare them for common denominators and then come up with my own redaction.

Although I work very near Sitar, I've not had a chance to eat there.

I might drag my best friend over there and then she can do a direct comparison... (yeah I know, like we need an excuse to go out to eat....)
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Postby Francesca » Tue Apr 18, 2006 3:26 pm

OK: Beth called me back and she has the following questions...

She said curry is a very broad general term - kind of like saying stew...

So we need to know:

1. What color was it?... was it yellow or red or green or white.

2. Was it sour?
3. How hot was it?
4. Did it have any nuts in it (if it has nuts they would usually be ground up so you would need to know by taste or if not well ground perhaps a grainy texture...)

5. What else could you tell was in it...?

Different regions of India make very different styles of curry. Do you know what regional style of Indian Cooking Sitar makes???

Also please not that In India curry usually has curry leaves in it but you can't buy them easily here...you usually settle for some sort of powder. Perhaps the restaurant has access to these

You may want to check the indian grocery store on Sutherland Avenue if they have not already closed. I don't know if dried curry leaves would translate as well as fresh but it's worth a shot.

That's all for now...
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Postby DarkVader » Tue Apr 18, 2006 4:40 pm

I think the curry he's refering to is what is listed on the Sitar menu as "Chicken Curry".

They make it with variable spice levels, but the default is mild.

It's a yellow curry, I suspect they are using a powder in it, but I'm not sure. If it has nuts, they're very fine ground, and not terribly noticeable. Maybe a bit of pine nut?

I think there's a bit of yogurt, but not much. I'm pretty sure there's cream in it.

If I were to try to duplicate it, I'd probably start with my curry powder I get shipped in from Haji Baba, in AZ - but I've found some nearly as good at the food co-op.

I'm still working on perfecting my imitation of their Karahai Lamb Palak, though. I've got the flavor nearly right, but can't quite get the texture.

And if anybody DOES get their hands on the Sitar recipes, let me know - but I suspect there is no paper copy.
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Postby Zeo » Tue Apr 18, 2006 7:15 pm

Pretty much what Vader said, and the standard chicken curry you would find on the menu at most Americanized Indian restaurants like Sitar and Kashmir.
Yellow curry, semi mild, although their vandiloo is very good as well. No nuts, just chicken and onions from what I can tell. I have been experimenting with recipes I have found online using madras curry powder and various combinations for sauces, some of which include tomato sauce, yogurt, cream, etc, and various other Ingredients, none of which match the quality and taste of curry chicken from Sitar. Also how do they cook their chicken to get it so tender? I expect they slow simmer it in the sauce, because every recipe I have tried instructs to cook the chicken in oil before adding the sauce, and it doesn't turn out the same that way.
If anyone could get actual recipes from Sitar that would be wonderful, but I doubt they would be willing to give away their secrets freely to the public. ;)
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Postby necrosynthesis » Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:22 pm

back when I waited tables, I was happy to give a recipe to a well-tipping customer. :-x
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Postby DarkVader » Tue Apr 25, 2006 10:47 pm

OK, I think we can be pretty sure that Sitar does not cook the chicken in oil... it's cooked in the sauce.

Maybe it's slow simmered... but I think they actually cook it pretty quickly - some prep work before you order it, but I don't think they've got a batch sitting back there.

I don't think there's tomato in it. pretty sure there's cream.
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Postby Zeo » Wed Apr 26, 2006 3:12 pm

My Indian friend Dibs is going to hook me up with his recipe for restaurant-style chicken curry. I'll post it as soon as I get it. 8-)
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Postby karlaBOO » Wed Apr 26, 2006 4:05 pm

DarkVader wrote:OK, I think we can be pretty sure that Sitar does not cook the chicken in oil... it's cooked in the sauce.

Maybe it's slow simmered... but I think they actually cook it pretty quickly - some prep work before you order it, but I don't think they've got a batch sitting back there.

I don't think there's tomato in it. pretty sure there's cream.


I'm betting instead of cream that it is coconut milk. It doesn't taste very "coconut-ty", but it thickens the sauce and makes it silky.
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Postby Francesca » Thu Apr 27, 2006 10:29 am

karlaBOO wrote:
DarkVader wrote:OK, I think we can be pretty sure that Sitar does not cook the chicken in oil... it's cooked in the sauce.

Maybe it's slow simmered... but I think they actually cook it pretty quickly - some prep work before you order it, but I don't think they've got a batch sitting back there.

I don't think there's tomato in it. pretty sure there's cream.


I'm betting instead of cream that it is coconut milk. It doesn't taste very "coconut-ty", but it thickens the sauce and makes it silky.


I agree about the coconut milk.... it's a traditional ingredient in this dish.
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Postby DarkVader » Sun May 07, 2006 8:58 pm

ok, played with this one for breakfast today...

if there is coconut milk, there isn't much. I got a distinct coconut milk flavor when I tried it, and that isn't there in Sitar's curry. I'm sure I used a bit too much...
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Postby Sir Diddimus » Tue May 16, 2006 9:51 am

From the Episode: Two Curry Traditions--

Indian Curry (Master Recipe)


Gather and prepare all of your ingredients before you begin. If you don't have a minichopper for pureeing the garlic and ginger, use a micorplane grater.You may substitute a scant half teaspoon of cayenne pepper for the jalapeño, adding it to the skillet with the other ground dried spices. As for choosing combinations of meat or fish with vegetables, we like the following: top sirloin or lamb with potatoes, chicken with zucchini, and shrimp with peas, but fee free to create your own pairings. Serve the curry with basmati rice.

Serves 4 to 6

Whole Spice Blend (Optional)
1 1/2 cinnamon sticks (3-inches)
4 whole cloves
4 green cardamom pods
8 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf

Curry
1/4 cup vegetable oil ( or canola oil)
1 medium onion , sliced thin
4 large cloves garlic , pureed in a minichopper with 1 tablespoon water (about 2 tablespoons)
1 tablespoon fresh ginger , pureed in a minichopper with 1-2 teaspoons water
1 1/2 pounds top sirloin or boneless leg of lamb, trimmed and cut into 3/4-inch cubes, or 6 chicken thighs, skinned, or 1 1/2 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
Table salt
3 plum tomatoes (canned), chopped, plus 1 tablespoon juice, or 2/3 cup crushed tomato, or 1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt
2 bunches spinach (1 1/2 pounds), stemmed, thoroughly washed, and chopped coarse (optional)
1 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves (optional)
2 cups water
1 jalapeño chile , stemmed and cut in half through the stem end
1/2 cup Indian split peas (channa dal), or 4 medium boiling potatoes, peeled and cut into 3/4-inch cubes, or 4 medium zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 1 cup green peas
2 - 4 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves (use the lesser amount if you've already added the optional cilantro)



See Illustrations Below: Six Steps to Aromatic Curry

1. Heat oil in large deep skillet or soup kettle, preferably nonstick, over medium-high heat until hot, but not smoking. If using whole spice blend, add to oil and cook, stirring with wooden spoon until cinnamon stick unfurls and cloves pop, about 5 seconds. If omitting whole spice blend, simply add onion to skillet; sauté until softened, 3 to 4 minutes, or browned, 5 to 7 minutes.

2. Stir in garlic, ginger, selected meat (except shrimp), ground spices, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, and tomatoes or yogurt; cook, stirring almost constantly, until liquid evaporates, oil separates and turns orange, and spices begin to fry, 5 to 7 minutes, depending on skillet or kettle size. Continue to cook, stirring constantly, until spices smell cooked, about 30 seconds longer.

3. Stir in optional spinach and/or cilantro. Add the water and jalapeño and season with salt; bring to simmer. Reduce heat; cover and simmer until meat is tender, 20 to 30 minutes for chicken, 30 to 40 minutes for beef or lamb.

4. Add selected vegetable (except green peas); cook until tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in cilantro. Add shrimp and/or peas if using. Simmer 3 minutes longer and serve.



STEP BY STEP: Six Steps to Aromatic Curry



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1. Cook the whole spices in the oil until the cinnamon sticks unfurl and the cloves pop, about 5 seconds.

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2. Add the onion to the oil and sautÇ it until it is soft and translucent, until browned, or until fully caramelized, depending on the individual curry.

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3. Add the spices, salt, tomatoes or yogurt, and the chicken, meat, or fish.

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4. Cook until the oil separates, then continue to cook until the oil turns orange, about 5 minutes longer.

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5. Add the water and cook until the meat is almost tender, about 20 to 30 minutes for the chicken or 30 to 40 minutes for the meat.

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6. Add the vegetables and cook until both the meat and vegetables are fully tender, about 15 minutes longer.








That recipe is from the PBS show, America's Test Kitchen. Shown locally, Saturdays @ 3:30PM on PBS of course....


Just another of the great shows on PBS!
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Postby iblis » Wed May 31, 2006 9:44 pm

random recipe i found:

Serves 2

* 2 Chicken Breasts chopped
* 2 Tablespoons Curry Massalla Gravy
* 2 Tablespoons thick yogurt
* Quarter of an onion finely chopped
* 3 Teaspoon Curry Powder
* 1 Teaspoon Chilli Powder
* 1 Finely Chopped Cayenne Chilli
* 4 Cloves Crushed Garlic
* 2 inches Root Ginger grated
* 5 Tablespoons Vegetable Oil
* 4 Tablespoons roughly chopped coriander leaves
* 1 Tablespoon whole coriander leaves
* 5 cups of spinach leaves finely chopped
* 1 teaspoon Garam Massalla


Make a paste of the curry powder and chilli powder with a little water. Fry the onion until translucent in the veg oil then add the garlic, ginger and chilli and stir fry on medium for a further 5 minutes. Add the curry and chilli powder paste and stir fry for a further 30 secs. Add the chicken pieces and seal on all sides then stir fry for 20 minutes or until the chicken is cooked. Now add the Massalla Gravy, yogurt and spinach and simmer for 5 minutes or until the spinach is reduced, stirring occasionally. Now add the finely chopped coriander leaves and cook for a further minute. Serve with the whole coriander leaves sprinkled over the top.


(nabbed from curry frenzy.)

(also note that the above recipe is for chicken sag. [sp?] it sounds good... but my idea of cooking is tossing on the ramen (or other noodles) and adding spices until it tastes right. so YMMV.)
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