A change of pace.

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A change of pace.

Postby Mercurygriffin » Mon Feb 26, 2007 8:43 pm

Time for me to make fun of someone else now.

E.M.O.
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Postby cutelittlepsycho20 » Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:25 pm

Noice!!

And i thought you already did that! :banghead: stupid emo kids!!!!
I hate that saying: "You can't have your cake and eat it too."

Because what's the point of having cake when you aren't able to savour and enjoy every tastey morsel it has to offer you.....
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Postby rec|use » Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:43 pm

i'm sure half of you won't care
and half of you this will go in one ear and out the other

but the shit that everyone is calling emo

isn't really emo


In 1985 in Washington, D.C., Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto, veterans of the DC hardcore music scene, decided to shift away from what they saw as the constraints of the basic style of hardcore and the escalating violence within the scene. They took their music in a more personal direction with a far greater sense of experimentation, bringing forth MacKaye's Embrace and Picciotto's Rites of Spring. The style of music developed by Embrace and Rites of Spring soon became its own sound. (Hüsker Dü's 1984 album Zen Arcade is often cited as a major influence for the new sound.) As a result of the renewed spirit of experimentation and musical innovation that developed the new scene, the summer of 1985 soon came to be known in the scene as "Revolution Summer".[1] [2]

Within a short time, the D.C. emo sound began to influence other bands such as Moss Icon, Nation of Ulysses, Dag Nasty, Soulside, Shudder To Think, Fire Party, Marginal Man, and Gray Matter, many of which were released on MacKaye's Dischord Records. The original wave of DC emo finally ended in late 1994 with the collapse of Hoover.

Where the term emo actually originated is uncertain, but members of Rites of Spring mentioned in a 1985 interview in Flipside Magazine that some of their fans had started using the term to describe their music. By the early 90s, it was not uncommon for the early DC scene to be referred to as emo-core, though it's unclear when the term shifted.
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Postby rec|use » Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:44 pm

i also think it's really funny when goth kids make fun of these "emo" kids
because it i think it gives them a chance to make someone else feel the way that industrial kids have treated them for years
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Postby junkie christ » Wed Feb 28, 2007 12:02 am

rec|use wrote:i'm sure half of you won't care
and half of you this will go in one ear and out the other

but the shit that everyone is calling emo

isn't really emo


In 1985 in Washington, D.C., Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto, veterans of the DC hardcore music scene, decided to shift away from what they saw as the constraints of the basic style of hardcore and the escalating violence within the scene. They took their music in a more personal direction with a far greater sense of experimentation, bringing forth MacKaye's Embrace and Picciotto's Rites of Spring. The style of music developed by Embrace and Rites of Spring soon became its own sound. (Hüsker Dü's 1984 album Zen Arcade is often cited as a major influence for the new sound.) As a result of the renewed spirit of experimentation and musical innovation that developed the new scene, the summer of 1985 soon came to be known in the scene as "Revolution Summer".[1] [2]

Within a short time, the D.C. emo sound began to influence other bands such as Moss Icon, Nation of Ulysses, Dag Nasty, Soulside, Shudder To Think, Fire Party, Marginal Man, and Gray Matter, many of which were released on MacKaye's Dischord Records. The original wave of DC emo finally ended in late 1994 with the collapse of Hoover.

Where the term emo actually originated is uncertain, but members of Rites of Spring mentioned in a 1985 interview in Flipside Magazine that some of their fans had started using the term to describe their music. By the early 90s, it was not uncommon for the early DC scene to be referred to as emo-core, though it's unclear when the term shifted.
old news. i think ive gave this rant about 1000 times
but the problem is this giant thousands of people populus that dont care.
thus its emo now.
im not defending the emo title
i hate all of the "emo" bands. i laughed my ass off at this. and i REALLY hate that fucking song.
but shit like Fugazi and Quicksand.... what used to be emo anyway...... i dig most of those guys.

in other news:
the punk bands that call themselves punk these days arent punk, numetal wasnt metal, and blame MARKETING DEPARTMENTS.
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Postby Mercurygriffin » Wed Feb 28, 2007 12:33 am

junkie christ wrote:
rec|use wrote:i'm sure half of you won't care
and half of you this will go in one ear and out the other

but the shit that everyone is calling emo

isn't really emo


In 1985 in Washington, D.C., Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto, veterans of the DC hardcore music scene, decided to shift away from what they saw as the constraints of the basic style of hardcore and the escalating violence within the scene. They took their music in a more personal direction with a far greater sense of experimentation, bringing forth MacKaye's Embrace and Picciotto's Rites of Spring. The style of music developed by Embrace and Rites of Spring soon became its own sound. (Hüsker Dü's 1984 album Zen Arcade is often cited as a major influence for the new sound.) As a result of the renewed spirit of experimentation and musical innovation that developed the new scene, the summer of 1985 soon came to be known in the scene as "Revolution Summer".[1] [2]

Within a short time, the D.C. emo sound began to influence other bands such as Moss Icon, Nation of Ulysses, Dag Nasty, Soulside, Shudder To Think, Fire Party, Marginal Man, and Gray Matter, many of which were released on MacKaye's Dischord Records. The original wave of DC emo finally ended in late 1994 with the collapse of Hoover.

Where the term emo actually originated is uncertain, but members of Rites of Spring mentioned in a 1985 interview in Flipside Magazine that some of their fans had started using the term to describe their music. By the early 90s, it was not uncommon for the early DC scene to be referred to as emo-core, though it's unclear when the term shifted.
old news. i think ive gave this rant about 1000 times
but the problem is this giant thousands of people populus that dont care.
thus its emo now.
im not defending the emo title
i hate all of the "emo" bands. i laughed my ass off at this. and i REALLY hate that fucking song.
but shit like Fugazi and Quicksand.... what used to be emo anyway...... i dig most of those guys.

in other news:
the punk bands that call themselves punk these days arent punk, numetal wasnt metal, and blame MARKETING DEPARTMENTS.


Thanks bro. Couldn't have stated the above better. Now, my issue is the simulated aspect. I hate the fakes that want the style, and feel none of the actual concept that made the idea in the first place.

Recluse. As a fellow noise maker I feel you on the Rivethead thing. There is a differance between Front Line Assymbly and The Cure. To say that the three big three named crap marketing E.M.O. bands aren't even slightly responicable for the other crap ( that has been around recently), in it's own little way hasn't killed the music that we love. Skinny Puppy is a great band, but crap will always rule the airwaves, no matter what we call it. This is just called E.M.O.
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